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Latest issue of the Australasian Journal of Regional Studies

SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST? CHALLENGES TO REGIONAL AVIATION AND REGIONAL COMMUNITIES FROM THE PRIVATISATION OF AUSTRALIA’S AIRPORTS

The privatisation of airports was intended to be positive for rural and regional Australia. Yet airlines and other airport users have expressed concern that airport operators are privately controlled monopolies (local councils) with little regard for the welfare of airport users and communities, taking a profit perspective in contrast to the provision of community services. This position is imposing greater challenges on regional aviation. There is evidence that government departments accept that there are significant economic benefits associated with development of regional areas; that accessibility for regional and remote communities is a matter of general equity and that they could assist airport operators to be more accountable and responsible for reducing their costs by efficiency gains. It is argued that government intervention is necessary to control the dominance of privatised airport operators, provide equity of opportunities, and safeguard the rights of least-advantaged citizens.

Dorothea Bowyer, Greg Jones, Graham Bowrey and Ciorstan Smark

Page Number - 1

EMPLOYMENT CHANGE IN MINING AND MANUFACTURING IN AUSTRALIA, 2010/11 – 2015/16: DISSECTING THE SUBNATIONAL PATTERNS AND CONCENTRATIONS

This paper recognises Krugman’s (1991) core-periphery model and analyses the reallocation of employment across the Australian metro and non-metro regions over the period 2010/11-2015/16. The differences were interpreted using shift-share analysis and industry-specific location quotients, and patterns of change and concentrations for mining and manufacturing are highlighted, given the significance of these industries during this period. The industry-specific location quotients suggest that there was a shift in relative concentrations of mining and manufacturing industries in non-metropolitan regions. The shift-share results are consistent and suggest that regional specialisation and regional competitiveness are characteristic of employment change in metro regions. In non-metropolitan regions, employment moved in line with the national effect. The causal factors that explain these employment disparities are the subject of on-going research.

Shanaka Herath and Kankesu Jayanthakumaran

Page Number - 29

SEACHANGE IN TASMANIA: EXPLORING INTERSTATE MIGRATION INTO THE ‘APPLE ISLE’

The quest for a better way of life is associated with the recent reversal of the historic trend of net interstate migration losses for Tasmania. In this paper, we examine data collected in 2019 through a survey with internal migrants who, were in the process of, or already had migrated to Tasmania. While in the past, the state has often experienced net internal migration loss, over the past five years this trend has reversed. We argue that one of the prevailing factors here is the quest for a better way of life. We identify that key motivators for these movements include the climate, lifestyle and work/life balance that Tasmania is perceived to offer. While we stop short of arguing this is evidence of climate change affecting migration patterns in Australia, there is strong evidence that the heat of mainland Australia is driving migration to temperate parts of Australia, like Tasmania. However, further research is needed to make stronger correlations between rising temperature and migration.

Nick Osbaldiston, Lisa Denny and Felicity Picken

Page Number - 55

WATER AND SANITATION PROGRAM IN DECENTRALISED EASTERN INDONESIA: THE ROLES OF COMMUNITY AND SOCIAL DYNAMICS

The recent decentralisation in Indonesia was expected to play a significant role in the development program aimed at addressing local issues, including water and sanitation. However, the lack of capacity of local governments could be a barrier to deliver adequate services. This study looks at policy implementation and how the community in the poorer regions of Eastern Indonesia are attempting to address water and sanitation issues. Specifically, this study aims to assess the implementation of Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) type programs. Based on surveys, in-depth interviews and using qualitative methods this study identifies the main actors and their contribution in the programs. The result shows that despite the required active involvement of Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) and the local community, local governments still hold a very important role in service delivery, especially their frontline staff, who provide routine communication with the community. The active involvement of many stakeholders also requires that local government continuously enhance its coordination efforts. The discussion provides an example of one local government that has provided a good coordination platform. Additionally, the findings suggest that financial assistance is still needed by poorer communities in implementing the program.

Anggun Susilo, Yogi Vidyattama and Dewa Ayu Putu Eva Wishanti

Page Number - 77